Fractional Laser Study

Resources on Fractional Laser Side Effects, Complications, & Research

Fractional Laser Study

PostPosted by Administrator » Fri Jun 18, 2010 8:21 pm

IN VIVO HISTOPATHOLOGICAL COMPARISON OF ACUTE INJURY FOLLOWING TREATMENT WITH FIVE FRACTIONAL ABLATIVE LASER DEVICES
Jordan Farkas, Steven Bailey, James Richardson, John Hoopman, Spencer Brown, Jeffrey Kenkel, UT Southwestern, Dallas, TX

ERUPTIVE SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA FOLLOWING FRACTIONATED CO2 LASER RESURFACING OF PHOTODAMAGED SKIN
Whitney D. Tope, Edward Szachowicz, Whitney Tope, Facial Plastic Surgery, Advancements in Dermatology, Edina, MN

HYPERTROPHIC SCARRING OF THE NECK FOLLOWING FRACTIONATED CO2 RESURFACING
Mathew M. Avram, Whitney D. Tope, Edward Szachowicz, J. Stuart Nelson, Facial Plastic Surgery, Advancements in Dermatology, Edina, MN, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

OBJECTIVE IN VIVO ASSESSMENT OF THE HEALING TIME AND THE HEALING OUTCOME BY CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY IN PATIENTS GOING TO A LASER ASSISTED MICROABLATIVE FRACTIONAL RESURFACING: COMPARATIVE STUDY
Eva Ciscar, Antonio Pardo, Xavier Alvarez, Gabriel Buendia, Barcelona, Spain

THERMAL INJURY CAUSES LETHALITY AND DNA DAMAGE IN UNHEATED SURROUNDING CELLS: ACTIVE THERMAL BYSTANDER EFFECT
Martin Purschke, Hans J. Laubach, R. Rox Anderson, Dieter Manstein, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA


Plast Reconstr Surg. 2008 Dec;122(6):1660-8. Links
TUNEL assay for histopathologic evaluation of irreversible chromosomal damage following nonablative fractional photothermolysis.
Farkas JP, Richardson JA, Hoopman JE, Brown SA, Kenkel JM.
Department of Plastic Surgery, Clinical Center for Cosmetic Laser Treatment, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Texas 75390-9163, USA.

BACKGROUN: Fractional photothermolysis is extremely popular in skin rejuvenation and remodeling procedures. However, the extent of thermal cellular injury beyond the borders of the coagulated microcolumns produced with fractional phototherapy is undefined. METHODS: Six abdominoplasty patients were pretreated with the Lux1540 Fractional Erbium device (Palomar, Inc., Burlington, Mass.) at various clinical laser settings. After tissue excision, the panni were immediately biopsied. Biopsy specimens were fixed in formalin, embedded in paraffin, sectioned, and evaluated with the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling (TUNEL) procedure for cellular necrosis/apoptosis. Tissue was sectioned horizontally and longitudinally to help define the depth and distribution of the microcolumns of injury in a three-dimensional plane. RESULTS: The extent of cellular necrosis/apoptosis at variable depths within the epidermis and dermis was demonstrated successfully with the TUNEL technique. After the Lux1540 treatment, TUNEL-positive nuclei were identified in a vertically oriented fashion that extended from the epidermis into the papillary and reticular dermis, highlighting the areas of injury. The TUNEL-positive nuclei defined lesions that were approximately 175 to 225 microm in diameter and penetrated to variable depths (200 to 900 microm), depending on the fluence used for treatment (18 to 100 mJ). CONCLUSIONS: TUNEL immunofluorescent labeling provided an accurate assessment of cellular damage within and surrounding the microthermal zones of coagulated collagen with respect to column depth and width. Because of its specificity, the TUNEL assay can be a useful adjunct to other histologic stains used to characterize cellular damage and matrix denaturation in skin treated with any fractional ablative or nonablative laser device.
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